Tuesday is election day in New Hampshire. Why, then, did DeSantis stay in South Carolina for the weekend? Ron DeSantis

Tuesday is election day in New Hampshire. Why, then, did DeSantis stay in South Carolina for the weekend?




Charleston, South Carolina During the last weekend of campaigning leading up to the nation's first-ever Republican presidential primary in New Hampshire, voters braved the cold to see Florida Governor Ron DeSantis.

Nevertheless, on Saturday, DeSantis met hundreds of people for a day of campaigning that began in Myrtle Beach, South Carolina, rather than making a retail stop in Nashua, N.H., or a town hall in Manchester.

"Well when I got off the plane I didn't know whether I was in South Carolina or New Hampshire because it was 30 degrees," he laughed.

It's unusual for a leading contender to visit South Carolina in the final days before the contest in New Hampshire, and it's unusually cold in Myrtle Beach.

DeSantis is polling in the single digits in New Hampshire, far behind former South Carolina governor Nikki Haley and former president Donald Trump, and she may not receive even one of the delegates required to eventually win the Republican nomination. This comes after DeSantis placed second in the Iowa caucus last week.

Although there are a few more races in the upcoming weeks, DeSantis is fully committed to the first south primary, which takes place at the end of February.

He told reporters on Saturday, "I think it's obvious if you look at this constituency, this is a great constituency for me." It's a military-heavy state with a large veteran population. The state is conservative."

To put it more clearly, DeSantis stated that he has a chance to perform well against Haley.

"There's just too many conservative voters here for someone like Nikki Haley to win the state," he stated.

Under the DeSantis campaign theory of the case, targeting the former South Carolina governor and beating her would force her out of the race and set up a true head to head against Trump before 16 states vote on Super Tuesday in early March.

And given Trump's indictments and concerns that President Biden could beat Trump for a second time, winning this state would be his best shot to convince primary voters he's a better option.

But like the New Hampshire contest this week, DeSantis is polling in third place and risks coming away empty handed in South Carolina, too

NOT THIS YEAR 




Republicans who support Ron DeSantis in the primary don't dislike him; in fact, there is considerable ideological overlap and support between DeSantis' and Trump's bases.

Jim Bolig of Myrtle Beach stated, "I would vote for the top three candidates; we have all good candidates." "I think former President Trump has a lot going for him."

"But I think they need to unite the three of them and pull it together, because as Republicans were getting whooped," he stated.

Bolig is just one of many attendees of DeSantis events in South Carolina over the weekend who told NPR they believed the man would be a fantastic president, but not with Trump in the race.

"President Trump's already been there, done that, and he showed leadership," Bolig said.

Ken Coleman echoed that sentiment.

"Unfortunately, I don't think it's his time," he stated prior to the occasion regarding DeSantis. "Not this year."

Coleman had the opportunity to question DeSantis about the Southern border and stopping illegal immigration at the end of the program. All day, when DeSantis' other plans for America were mentioned, the crowds cheered. He talked about cutting government spending and opposing diversity, equity, and inclusion programs at colleges and universities.

Coleman said of DeSantis, "He's got a great reputation among conservatives."
"I think right now it's just a little premature."

Donald Trump continues to hold a commanding lead in the primary according to both national and state-level polls. Sen. Tim Scott and other prominent Republicans from the Palmetto State began the weekend campaigning for Trump in New Hampshire while DeSantis traveled from New Hampshire to South Carolina.

At a rally, Scott, a former presidential contender who had earlier declared that Trump could not win the general election in 2024, supported the outgoing president and declared that "we need Donald Trump."

Donald Trump continues to hold a commanding lead in the primary according to both national and state-level polls. Sen. Tim Scott and other prominent Republicans from the Palmetto State began the weekend campaigning for Trump in New Hampshire while DeSantis traveled from New Hampshire to South Carolina.

At a rally, Scott, a former presidential contender who had earlier declared that Trump could not win the general election in 2024, supported the outgoing president and declared that "we need Donald Trump."

DeSantis claims he has a clear route to the nomination and is in it for the long run. However, even he appears to be aware that the path does not currently pass through South Carolina.

DeSantis canceled his major Sunday TV appearances to return to the Granite State and resume campaigning where voters will cast ballots on Tuesday, following a Saturday spent dining out throughout South Carolina.



















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